Last edited by Mebei
Friday, February 14, 2020 | History

6 edition of Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts found in the catalog.

Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts

China, Healing, and the West to 1848

by Linda L. Barnes

  • 350 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History of medicine,
  • Traditional medicine & remedies,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • History: World,
  • China,
  • Anthropology - Cultural,
  • Asia - China,
  • History,
  • History / China

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages480
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7691874M
    ISBN 100674023978
    ISBN 109780674023970

    Please call before going to store. Also attended the University of Puerto Rico Academic Work[ edit ] Dr. Education: Smith CollegeB. Just punch in the coordinates and head off to find your fortune in lost treasure.

    Chinese body theory zangfuwhich is more about function, the transmission and storage of qi activity according to yin-yang analysis and the Five Phases theory than about the Needles structure of organs, was commonly seen as merely a primitive, inferior version of western anatomy. Compare all 3 sellers About This Item We aim to show you accurate product information. A town often becomes a ghost because the economic activity that supported it has failed, or due to natural or human-caused disasters such as a flood, government action, uncontrolled lawlessness, or war. Divided into five sections, the book's first section, "Sites of Healing: Domestic Spaces, Public Spaces," looks at the role that location plays in healing traditions.

    In the earlier periods medical theories in Europe derived from the writings of Galen and were framed by the concept of the four humours, which were linked to the four elements, earth, air, fire, and water. She thus provides an invaluable complement to existing scholarship that focuses on cross-cultural medical exchange in the context of Western imperialism and presumed biomedical superiority. When our Heart is functioning freely, we experience ease and feel connected to the people and environment around us. Finding lost treasures has never been so easy. When pine needles are attached to a branch, hang above your front door to bring in prosperity and keep out negativity. According to a profile of the author on Boston University's Web site, Barnes "is committed to including an understanding of the healing practices of culturally complex patient populations in the training of clinicians, and to helping clinicians better understand how religious worldviews play a part in patient and family understandings of illness and healing.


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Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts book

Clover is the national flower of Ireland and its said if you find a four-leaf clover, it brings the best of luck. This perennial plant has round, green leaves and blooms tiny white flowers.

Section five, "Intersections with Medical and Psychotherapeutic Discourses," explores religious healing within modern medical contexts, including biomedicine.

Linda L. Barnes

In the process, the author addresses issues such Needles when the western continents first learned about Chinese healing traditions and how Chinese acupuncture was "rediscovered" in the West in the s.

The 'five phases' diagram was thought to be the equivalent of the four elements, but the Chinese were reproved for having the 'wrong' elements and for believing that these could change from one to another. The substantive chapters of the book discuss these "racializing," "religionizing," and "medicalizing" dynamics in five successive chronological periods.

Most left, sometimes so abruptly that towns were often left in a state of suspended animation, with displays still standing in shop windows, bottles and glasses on saloon tables, and the shelves of abandoned cabins lined with pieces of crockery. And she goes on: This concern has led some not only to revisit the heritage of Western vitalism but also to look beyond it to alternate formulations—in this case, through a language of energy to the paradigm of qi.

Barnes served as the consultant to faculty-development workshops, sponsored by the AAR and funded by the Lilly Endowmentthe Luce Foundationand the National Endowment for the Humanitiesfor faculty in religious studies.

She has unearthed numerous examples of Western missionaries, merchants, diplomats, and physicians in China, Europe, and America encountering and interpreting both Chinese people and their healing practices, and sometimes adopting their own versions of these practices.

First of all, those who mediated China to the West were educated in the West and firm believers in western religion, civilization and science, and came to China not for academic study but for reasons of religion, trade or politics.

Most directly, Barnes presents a compelling study of what one might term "medical orientalism," showing that European and later American depictions of Chinese practices were shaped as much by Western self-perceptions and cultural frameworks as by any Chinese realities.

She is currently writing a book on the cultural and social history of Chinese medicine and healing traditions in the United States, beginning in and continuing up through the present. This cosmological difference produced many misunderstandings.

She traces these misinterpretations to three intertwining dynamics: efforts to classify the Chinese according to an imagined hierarchy of peoples defined biblically, geographically, and physically; attempts to explain Chinese religious eclecticism in terms of Judeo-Christian monotheism; and the imperfect mapping of Western anatomical, humoral, and vitalist paradigms onto the Chinese body of qi.

Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. And while eighteenth-century European doctors marveled at the efficacy of moxabustion—the burning of compressed cones of artemesia on the skin at specific acupoints—they effectively stripped away its cultural origins and underlying rationale by defining it simply as a variant form of cautery, a standard European therapy pp.

For example, in Acupuncture, expertise and cross-cultural medicineRoberta E Bivins reveals the distortions and deep misunderstandings within cross-cultural medicine and the reasons behind them, and focuses on how Chinese acupuncture was perceived and practised in the West from the seventeenth century, with an emphasis on how the interests of social groups impacted on and shaped medicine.

Their observations and evaluations of China and its healing traditions were subservient to these primary goals and conditioned by preconceptions of race, religion, morality and medicine.

It was in this period that the Chinese were described as a distinct race with a particular trait of dishonesty. Gather a bunch of flowers and leave in a vase on your altar to bring happiness and harmony to your sacred space. Or offer the flowers to your ancestors or gods.

The book's fourth section, "Synergy, Syncretism, and Appropriation," examines how syncretism the attempt to reconcile disparate or contradictory beliefs and appropriation work within multicultural contexts, such as American Buddhism. While others are found all over the world.

In any case, there was as much interest in moxa the burning of herbs on or near the skin as in acupuncture; moxa appeared more similar to contemporary Western practices such as cauterisation.

François Xavier d'Entrecolles

Has served on numerous advisory boards and panels. Feathers indicate your spirit guides or ancestors are sending you a message. Moxibustion and acupuncture were interpreted as humorally and anatomically based surgical interventions, with no acknowledgement of the Chinese theory surrounding these practices.Interdisciplinary and informative, Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts will become a standard reference for anyone interested in the history of medical exchange, the hybridization of healing knowledge, and the intercultural negotiations of illness and cure.

Get this from a library! Needles, herbs, gods, and ghosts: China, healing, and the West to [Linda L Barnes] -- "When did the West discover Chinese healing traditions? Most people might point to the "rediscovery" of Chinese acupuncture in the s. In Needles. When did the West discover Chinese healing traditions?

Most people might point to the "rediscovery" of Chinese acupuncture in the s. In Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts, Linda Barnes leads us back, instead, to the thirteenth century to uncover the story of the West's earliest known encounters with Chinese understandings of illness and healing.

As Westerners struggled to understand new Price: $ Most people might point to the "e;rediscovery"e; of Chinese acupuncture in the s. In Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts, Linda Barnes leads us back, instead, to the thirteenth century to uncover the story of the West's earliest known encounters with Chinese understandings of.

Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts: China, Healing, and the West to Cambridge: Harvard University Press. In a book that attempts to be comprehensive in its treatment of Sino-Western history, the absence of references to important works by contemporary scholars such as Ad Dudink, Nicolas Standaert, and the late Erik Zürcher is.

Sep 20,  · The Missionary’s Egg The Missionary’s Egg Bivins, Roberta Metascience () – Springer DOI /s REVIEW Linda L. Barnes, Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts: China, Healing, and the West to Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Pp. xvii + US$ HB. By Roberta Bivins Linda Barnes set.

Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts